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Thursday, November 26, 2020 | History

2 edition of Regulatory perspectives on model validation in high-level radioactive waste management programs found in the catalog.

Regulatory perspectives on model validation in high-level radioactive waste management programs

Regulatory perspectives on model validation in high-level radioactive waste management programs

a joint NRC/SKI white paper

by

  • 59 Want to read
  • 18 Currently reading

Published by Division of Waste Management, Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O. [distributor] in Washington, DC .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Radioactive waste disposal in the ground -- Mathematical models -- Evaluation.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementprepared by N.A. Eisenberg ... [et al.].
    ContributionsEisenberg, N. A., U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Division of Waste Management., Sweden. Office of Nuclear Waste Safety., Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (Southwest Research Institute)
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Paginationxi, 39, [25] p.
    Number of Pages39
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17701212M


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Regulatory perspectives on model validation in high-level radioactive waste management programs Download PDF EPUB FB2

Regulatory Perspectives on Model Validation in High-Level Radioactive Waste Management Programs: A Joint NRC/SKI White Paper Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses U.S.

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards Washington, DC I. Regulatory perspectives on model validation in high-level radioactive waste management programs: a joint NRC/SKI white paper.

[N A Eisenberg; U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Division of Waste Management. Regulatory perspectives on model validation in high-level radioactive waste management programs: a joint NRC/SKI white paper: The RELAP5/MOD code manual volume I Code Structure, System Models, and Solution Methods: Report on the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station.

* NUREG -"Branch Technical Position on the Use of Expert Elicitation in the High-Level Radioactive Waste Program" * ASNT-TC-1A -"Recommended Practice for Nondestructive Testing Personnel Qualification and Certification" * NUREG - "Regulatory Perspectives on Model Validation in High-Level Radioactive Waste Management Programs".

The objective of radioactive waste management is to deal with radioactive waste in a manner that protects human health and the environment, now and in the future, without imposing an undue burden on future generations.

National regulations and internationally recommended standards and guidelines have been developed dealing with radiation protection and radioactive waste management. Approach to Radioactive Waste Management • Various approaches or models for national radioactive waste management comply with terms of the Joint Convention – “Each Contracting Party shall establish and maintain a legislative and regulatory framework to govern the safety of spent fuel and radioactive waste management.” (Article ).

The safety of radioactive waste management is the most important aspect for each country, which has not described the practical implementation of the general safety concepts. Establishing a regulatory framework is the basic issue in radioactive waste by: 1.

Today one of the major challenges facing by mankind is to provide proper management for radioactive waste management. Any industrial activity results in generation of some waste. Radioactive waste management requires planned and systematic actions to provide confidence that the entire system, processes and final products will satisfy given requirements for quality.

In order to ensure a quality end product, it is absolutely necessary to know and control theFile Size: 1MB. Section 3 Radioactive Waste Management Cases (RWMCs) This section describes regulatory expectations with respect to the production, content, maintenance and review of radioactive waste management cases (RWMCs), and provides links to further guidance on how the components that support an RWMC may be Size: KB.

SKI Report Regulatory Perspectives on Model Validation in High-Level Radioactive Waste Programs: A Joint NRC/SKI White Paper, Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, March Available from International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna International Centre, PO BoxA Vienna, Austria, Model Regulations for the Use of Radiation Sources and for the Management of the Associated Radioactive Waste If you would like to learn more about the IAEA’s work, sign up for our weekly updates containing our most important news, multimedia and more.

EO 4 –State the two common types of high-level radioactive waste. EO 5 –Discuss the generation, processing, and storage of the two types of high-level radioactive waste.

EO 6 –For the following areas of Radioactive Waste Management, describe their importance to the operator and the information is involved in each area:File Size: 2MB. of nuclear facilities.

This will allow waste minimization options to be properly planned and assessed as part of national, site and plant waste management policies.

This objective will be achieved by: reviewing the sources and characteristics of radioactive materials arising from D&D activities; reviewing waste minimizationFile Size: KB. The overall objective of radioactive waste management is to deal with radioactive waste in a manner that protects human health and the environment, now and in the future, and without imposing undue burdens on future generations [1].

Radioactive waste management. Nuclear Waste Policy Act and the efforts by the federal government to site a national repository for high-level radioactive wastes.

In an Appendix, the report provided a chronology of significant events regarding nuclear power beginning with the adoption of the Atomic Energy Act of and continuing through December There is.

Radioactive Waste Management Confidence in Models of Radionuclide Transport for Site-specific Assessments Workshop Proceedings Carlsbad, New Mexico, United States June hosted by the US Department of Energy. Radioactive Waste Disposal into a Plastic Clay Formation (A Site Specific Exercise of Probabilistic Assessment of Geological Containment) by Marco d'Alessandro and Arnold Bonne Volume 3 Management of Plutonium Contaminated Waste edited by J.

Grover Volume 4 Research and Development on Radioactive Waste Manage­File Size: 3MB. FEDERAL PROGRAMS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE MONITORING CONDUCTED UNDER MINNESOTA STATUTES C Prepared By: John Wachtler Alan Mitchell Environmental Quality Board A N N U A L R E P O R T APRIL STATEANDCOMMUNITYSERVICES.

Advances in Water Resources 15 () Ground-water models cannot be validated Leonard F. Konikow us Geological Survey, National Center, Reston, Virginia USA & John D. Bredehoeft US Geological Survey, Middle[ield Road, MSMenlo Park, CaliforniaUSA Ground-water models are embodiments of scientific by: NEA News.

NEA News is the professional journal of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). It features articles on the latest nuclear energy issues concerning the economic and technical aspects of nuclear energy, nuclear safety and regulation, radioactive waste management, radiological protection, nuclear science and nuclear legislation.

validation studies are shown to have a role only in the context that their results can narrow the scope of initial investigations that should be considered in a performance assessment.

In addition, validation needs for performance assessment of low-level waste disposal facilities Author: M.W. Kozak, N.E. Olague. In The Road to Yucca Mountain, J. Samuel Walker traces the U.S. government's tangled efforts to solve the technical and political problems associated with radioactive waste.

From the Manhattan Project through the designation in of Yucca Mountain in Nevada as a high-level waste repository, Walker thoroughly investigates the approaches adopted by the U.S. Atomic Cited by: The regulatory criteria for high-level waste disposal in countries with major radioactive waste programs are summarized in Table Regardless of the prescribed regulatory criterion (risk, dose, or other less obvious criteria) most countries have recognized the need for a probabilistic approach to demonstrate compliance with the criterion due Cited by: assessment method applied to waste management), as one means of ensuring that its licensees meet its regulations.

The staff is applying performance assessment methods in various waste management programs, namely high-level waste, low-level waste, and decommissioning. Each of the programmatic.

SOLIDIFIED REPROCESSING WASTE GOALS FOR HIGH-LEVEL NUCLEAR WASTE MANAGE­ MENT A. A voidance of Unnecessary Risk 1. TREATMENT 2. TRANSPORTATION 3. STORAGE 4. DISPOSAL B. Equitable Distribution of Risk DEVELOPING A RESPONSIBLE RADIOACTIVE WASTE MAN AGEMENT PROGRAM A.

Military Reprocessing Waste B. High-Level Waste. Following the Council’s invitation to set up a High Level Group at EU level, as recorded in its Conclusions of 8 May on Nuclear Safety and Safe Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel and Radioactive Waste, the European Nuclear Safety Regulators Group (ENSREG) was set up by Commission Decision //Euratom of 17 July on.

The management of higher activity radioactive waste on nuclear licensed sites Part 3c Storage of Radioactive Waste Joint guidance from the Office for Nuclear Regulation, the Environment Agency and the Scottish Environment Protection Agency to nuclear licensees November File Size: KB.

document, the ^Waste Plan for the long-term management of high-level and/or long-lived radioactive waste, all elements necessary to enable the Government to take, with full knowledge of the facts, a decision in principle, i.e. a general policy decision or general guidance decision relating to the long-term management of categories B and C waste.

are dealing with the question of nuclear waste disposal both domestically and on an international level, and make suggestionsfor a more aggressive inter-national regulation of nuclear waste disposal. The common threat posed to the economies of the United States, Western Europe, and Japan by the monopoly power of the oil export.

A IA center of excellence in earth sciences and engineering Heterogeneous Media and hosted by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (Sweden) in Aspto, a Regulatory Perspective" This paper is a product of the CNWRA and does not necessarily reflect the view(s) or regulatory position of the NRC.

Office for Nuclear Regulation Report: NS-TAST-GD Revision 6 CM9 Ref.: / Page 4 of 27 Regulation 9 (restriction of exposure) Regulation 12 (dose limitation) Regulation 29 (accounting for radioactive substances) Regulation 30 (keeping and moving of radioactive substances).

The Carriage of Dangerous Goods and Use of Transportable PressureFile Size: KB. Acceptance criteria for processing radioactive waste. Waste characterisation is an important part of waste management. The first inspection and the assertion of the characteristics of the incoming waste performed by the operator of a pre-disposal facility (e.g.

the operator of a conditioning facility) will indicate what conditioning and disposal decisions will be made with Cited by: 5. On this page: Rule Summary; Rule History; Rule Summary. This regulation sets environmental standards for public protection from the management and disposal of spent nuclear fuel spent nuclear fuelFuel that has been withdrawn from a nuclear reactor after use.

It is still highly radioactive., high-level radioactive wastes high-level radioactive wasteHighly radioactive. This includes so-called high-level (HL) and transuranic contaminated low-level (TRU) wastes. because they raise the most pressing and difficult radioactive waste management and regulatory issues.

Although the report focuses on the U.S., important international radioactive waste management and regulation. This publication provides advice on an appropriate set of regulations covering all aspects of the use of radiation sources and the safe management of the associated radioactive waste.

The publication provides the framework for the regulatory requirements and conditions to be incorporated into.

The disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in a geologic repository requires materials performance over time periods unprecedented in any previous engineering application.

Corrosion-resistant barriers of nickel-based and titanium alloys are currently proposed for the engineered barrier system of a repository that may be located at Cited by: 3. Regulatory Control of Radioactive Waste Management – Overview of 15 NEA Member Countries 1 provides an important source of reference for all stakeholders intent on learning about the regulatory functions and practices in these NEA member countries.

The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) is a specialised agency within the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), an intergovernmental organisation of industrialised countries, based in Paris, France.

The mission of the NEA is to assist its Member countries in maintaining and further developing, through international co-operation, the scientific. NW-G Policies and Strategies for Radioactive Waste Management INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY VIENNA ISBN –92–0––5 ISSN – This guide is intended to help Member States in developing or upgrading national policies and strategies for spent fuel and radioactive waste management.

14th International High-Level Radioactive Waste Management Conference (IHLRWM ) Albuquerque, NM, April May 2, Item ID: | .Waste diversion or landfill diversion is the process of diverting waste from success of landfill diversion can be measured by comparison of the size of the landfill from one year to the next.

If the landfill grows minimally or remains the same, then .The theme of the IHLRWM Conference was, "Progress Made and Challenges Ahead for Safe Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Waste." The meeting addressed scientific, technical, social, and regulatory aspects of the entire back end of the nuclear fuel cycle, including waste generation, transportation, storage, treatment, disposal, regulation, and stakeholder .